Mean and Lowly Things, by Kate Jackson

I have just shot two days when I should have gotten a lot more done than I did reading Harvard graduate student Kate Jackson’s absorbing (to put it mildly) recount of her three trips to collect specimen snakes and amphibia in the Republic of Congo (as distinguished from the Democratic Republic of Congo). Dr. Jackson’s passion for herpetology overcame the most intolerable of circumstances, camping for weeks in deep jungle, bitten daily by all manner of insects, snakes, and other creatures. She seems to have no end of tolerance for discomfort, which for me pretty much defines how much adventure a person will have in her life.

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The Royal Scot: Another Thank You

The last house painting I did—the Chautauqua House—was my first experiment painting with gouache and a resist (a substance much like rubber cement that blocks paint). I fell in love with gouache’s rich colors and velvet matte surface. Although it’s basically watercolor, it’s opaque, not transparent, and therefore much more forgiving. It’s possible to paint over mistakes, at least sometimes.

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Chautauqua Vacation House

I have been known to trade art for a spell in paradise, not unlike other artists lacking funds to buy (or even rent) such a place. The family who own this house have hosted me not only in this wonderful Chautauqua, New York, home, but also in at least two Key West condominiums, as well as at a newly built Ocala horse ranch. This painting, done in gouache on illustration board, is about 16×20 inches—my thank you.

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My Beaver Island Commission: Finished at Last

It was Ray Cole’s idea to auction me off to do a painting of somebody’s vacation home—or the view from it—to raise money for the Beaver Island Health Center. He and Nina had commissioned me to do two paintings—one of the Beaver Island Lodge and another showing the View from the Beaver Island Lodge. The paintings came out well, so we thought we’d see if anyone else would be interested.

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A Lump, the Second Time Around

It’s been four years since I finished my treatment for breast cancer—long enough for me to forget to be on high awareness mode and always take a friend when dealing with the world of hospitals and labs, even if things look relatively straight forward. After all, for four years, my routine mammograms had been clear.

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A Lump, the Second Time Around…..

It’s been four years since I finished my treatment for breast cancer—long enough for me to forget to be on high awareness mode and always take a friend when dealing with the world of hospitals and labs, even if things look relatively straight forward. After all, for four years, my routine mammograms had been clear.

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